Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Rohingya villages destroyed in Myanmar and refugees flood Bangladesh



More than 1,200 homes have been razed in villages inhabited by Myanmar's Muslim Rohingya minority in the past six weeks, Human Rights Watch says.

The group has released a batch of new satellite images that it says show 820 structures were destroyed between 10-18 November.

The military is conducting security operations in Rakhine but the government denies it is razing homes.

The Rohingya are one of the world's most persecuted minority groups.

Here is a report from BBC on the subject.


As a result of Myanmar's latest genocidal pogroms many Rohingyas are trying to flee to nearby Bangladesh whose government is not keen on welcoming them either to avoid jeopardizing its not-so-warm relationship with Suu Kyi's Mogher mulluk - Myanmar. Here below is a report from the Reuters.
Hundreds of Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar crossed the border to Bangladesh over the weekend and on Monday, aid workers said, seeking shelter from escalating violence in the northwest that has killed at least 86 people and displaced some 30,000.
An official from the International Organization for Migration (IOM), the United Nations' migration agency, who did not want to be identified, said he had witnessed more than 500 people enter its camps in the hills near the border on Monday.
Aid workers from other United Nations agencies and Reuters reporters in the IOM camps also reported seeing Rohingyas who said they had recently fled the fighting in Myanmar. The UN workers did not give specific numbers, but expressed concern about a sudden influx of people.
Moulavi Aziz Khan, 60, from a village in northern Rakhine, said he left Myanmar last week, after the military surrounded his home and set fire to it.
"At that time, I fled with my four daughters and three grandsons to a nearby hill ... later, we managed to cross the border," he said.
Up to 30,000 people are now estimated to be displaced and thousands more affected by the recent fighting, the UN has said.
Humanitarian operations that had been providing food, cash, and nutrition to more than 150,000 people have been suspended for more than 40 days.
The UN refugee agency called on the Myanmar government for access to allow it to distribute aid.
"The idea is to help them where they are, so that they wouldn't be forced to cross over into Bangladesh," Vivian Tan, regional public information officer for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, told Reuters Television.
"If they can't get the assistance where they are then, if they are forced to cross into another country like Bangladesh, we're really appealing to the Bangladeshi government to honor its long tradition of hospitality and open its borders to these refugees."

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